BCHM432/BMED832 - Molecular Basis of Cell Function

Course Description:
The course will focus on several key signaling pathways initiated by the binding of ligands to cell surface receptors. Emphasis will be placed on the general principals that underlie these pathways and on the structure, catalytic activity, regulatory properties and functions of the proteins that make up these pathways. These include serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases, small GTPases, ubiquitin E3 ligases, G protein coupled receptors, heterotrimeric G proteins and anchoring/adaptor/scaffold proteins. The synthesis and physiological functions of leukotrienes, prostaglandins, specialized pro-resolving mediator, endocannabinoids and sphingosine 1-phosphate will be examined in detail, 
Course Objectives:
The primary objective of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the major signaling pathways that regulate important cell functions such as growth, proliferation, survival and motility.  Emphasis will be placed on the biochemical properties, including structure and enzymatic activity, of key signaling enzymes such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, G protein coupled receptors and the enzymes that synthesize leukotrienes and prostaglandins.
Textbook: None
Evaluation:

Marking Scheme

            Mid-term exam………………………… 20%

            Presentations………………………….. 20%

                        Oral presentation…….12%

                        Written summary……..3.5%

                        Questions……………..4.5%

           Assignment...........................................10%            

           Final exam……………………………… 50%

Grading Method:
Queen’s Official Grade Conversion Scale

Grade  Numerical Course Average (Range)

A+            90-100

A              85-89

A-             80-84

B+            77-79

B              73-76

B-             70-72

C+            67-69

C              63-66

C-             60-62

D+            57-59

D              53-56

D-             50-52

F              49 and below

Academic Integrity: Academic integrity is constituted by the five core fundamental values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility (see www.academicintegrity.org). These values are central to the building, nurturing and sustaining of an academic community in which all members of thecommunity will thrive. Adherence to the values expressed through academic integrity forms a foundation for the "freedom of inquiry and exchange of ideas" essential to the intellectual life of the University (see the Senate Report on Principles and Priorities: http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/policies/senateandtrustees/principlespriorities.html).
Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the regulations concerning academic integrity
and for ensuring that their assignments conform to the principles of academic integrity. Information on
academic integrity is available in the Arts and Science Calendar (see Academic Regulation 1
http://www.queensu.ca/artsci/academic-calendars/2011-2012-calendar/academic-regulations/regulation-
1), on the Arts and Science website (see http://www.queensu.ca/artsci/academics/undergraduate/academic-integrity), and from the instructor of this course. Departures from academic integrity include plagiarism, use of unauthorized materials, facilitation, forgery and falsification, and are antithetical to the development of an academic community at Queen's. Given the seriousness of these matters, actions which contravene the regulation on academic integrity carry sanctions that can range from a warning or the loss of grades on an assignment to the failure of a course to a requirement to withdraw from the university.

Instructors:

Donald H. Maurice
Graham P. Cote

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions, contact Course Coordinator: Dr. Graham P. Cote

Last Updated: Sep, 10 2017