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Stephen H. Scott PhD
 Stephen H. Scott
Position(s)
Professor
Contact Info
Centre For Neuroscience Studies, Botterell Hall Room 219
(613) 533-2855

Faculty Bio

My research focuses on how different regions of the brain are involved in motor control and learning. I have developed a robotic device called KINARM that can both sense and perturb planar arm movements. One of my research labs examines neural activity in different brain regions of non-human primates during motor behavior. A second lab explores human motor performance and learning. A third lab located at St. Mary's of the Lake Hospital is used to quantify sensorimotor impairments in stroke and other neurological disorders.

Research Interests

My research focuses on how different regions of the brain are involved in motor control and learning. I have developed a robotic device called KINARM that can both sense and perturb planar arm movements.  One of my research labs examines neural activity in different brain regions of non-human primates during motor behavior.  A second lab explores human motor performance and learning.  A third lab located at St. Mary’s of the Lake Hospital is used to quantify sensorimotor impairments in stroke and other neurological disorders.

Sources of Research Funds: Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, GlaxoSmithKline.

Selected Publications

Neural Basis of Movement:

1. Scott, S.H., Gribble, P. , Graham, K. and Cabel, D.W. (2001) Dissociation between hand motion and population vectors from neural activity in motor cortex. Nature 413:161-165.

2. Gribble, P.L. and Scott, S.H. (2002) Overlap of multiple internal models in primary motor cortex. Nature 417:938-941.

3. Kurtzer, I. Herter, T.M. and Scott, S.H. (2005) Random change in cortical load representation suggests distinct control of posture and movement. Nature Neuroscience 8:498-504.

Human Motor Performance:

4. Nozaki, D., Kurtzer, I. and Scott, S.H. (2006) To learn with one limb or two? Limited transfer between unimanual and bimanual skills within the same limb. Nature Neuroscience 9:1364-1366.

5. Singh, K. and Scott, S.H. (2003) A motor learning strategy reflecting neural circuitry for limb control. Nature Neuroscience 6:399-403.

Motor Function in Neurological Disorders:

6. Scott, S.H. and Norman, K.E. (2003) Computational approaches to motor control and their potential role for interpreting motor dysfunction. [Invited Review] Current Opinion in Neurology 16:693-698.

Theories of Motor Control:

7. Scott, S.H. (2004) Optimal feedback control and the neural basis of motor control. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5:532-546.